Let the past sleep, but let it sleep in the sweet embrace of Christ, and let us go on into the invincible future with Him. (Oswalt Chambers)

Monday, July 24, 2006

CIC Socks Ready to Mail

Note: This post was updated July 27 to include yarn information. I tried to take the easy way out and skip it, but my readers wouldn't let me get away with being lazy and questions were asked. I'm so pleased that you read my blog and care. Hope the additional comments answer all your yarn questions.

It's the last week of the CIC_Knit List Summer Sock Extravaganza. Seven pair of children's wool socks are washed and ready to mail to the CIC distribution site.

As always, they were quick and fun to knit.

Two pair of CIC socks from Sixth Sense patternFor the first two pair, I used Susan Laurence's Sixth Sense pattern.

The pattern was written for the Six Sock Knitalong. Then Susan, who is a supporter of CIC, generously gave the pattern to the CIC_Knit List for our continued use.

It's a fancy rib pattern, perfect for kids socks.

The blue pair on the left were knit using some leftover Lorna's Laces worsted weight yarn I've had in my stash for years.

The red pair were knit using Elann's Peruvian Highland Wool (worsted weight) in Candy Cane Red. I ran out of yarn, so the toes are a combination of sport weight Nature Spun with some fingering weight sock yarn.


Two pair of CIC socksThe orange pair were knit using the basketweave ribbing stitch and Elann's Peruvian Highland Wool (worsted weight) in Orange Brandy.

The light green pair were knit using Mossy Ridge, a delightful pattern from CIC_Knit List member Sherie. The yarn is Elann's Peruvian Highland Wool (worsted weight) in Celadon.


Three pair of CIC socksYou can guess by now that I like to use variations on a rib for my CIC socks. The ribbing pattern gives the socks more elasticity so they fit a wider range of foot sizes and stay on the kids feet better.

The reddish socks on the left are knit from Anne, a fingering weight yarn with mohair content. The mohair makes them fuzzy and warmer than other fingering weight sock yarns.

Normally I wouldn't use fingering weight yarn for CIC. I knit these socks for myself without checking gauge and they turned out too small. Fortunately there are kids in Eastern Europe who need them, so I don't feel my knitting and yarn are wasted.

The middle socks are knit from more Elann's Peruvian Highland Wool (worsted weight) in Orange Brandy.

The green socks on the right use some left over Cascade 220 and the remainder of my Elann's Peruvian Highland Wool (worsted weight) in Celadon.

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